Rochers de Naye in Bright Sunlight

Rochers de Naye in Bright Sunlight

Charcoal pencil and Conte Crayon on watercolour paper. Private Collection

Kate Hammersley’s journey through the French and Swiss Alps led her to create a series of drawings exploring landscape and permanence. These drawings capture mountains in flux, contrasting the millions of years of continual change that created them with the ‘Anthropocene’ the relatively short proposed geological epoch that references humankind’s activity on the landscape. These drawings, some of which use soot based Japanese Sumi ink, are ‘real’ landscapes caught in a moment in time which do not attempt to slavishly copy scenery.  They aim to reflect the feeling of being amongst mountains – a contemporary reimagining of the sublime.  The drawings are very intimate in scale, humanising the vastness of the landscapes they portray, refusing to shy away from including some of the contemporary human intrusions in mountain scenery such as street lights and electricity pylons.